Microscopy Primer
Light and Color
Microscope Basics
Special Techniques
Digital Imaging
Confocal Microscopy
Live-Cell Imaging
Photomicrography
Microscopy Museum
Virtual Microscopy
Fluorescence
Web Resources
License Info
Image Use
Custom Photos
Partners
Site Info
Contact Us
Publications
Home

The Galleries:

Photo Gallery
Silicon Zoo
Pharmaceuticals
Chip Shots
Phytochemicals
DNA Gallery
Microscapes
Vitamins
Amino Acids
Birthstones
Religion Collection
Pesticides
BeerShots
Cocktail Collection
Screen Savers
Win Wallpaper
Mac Wallpaper
Movie Gallery

Polarized Light Microscopy Digital Image Gallery

Sulforaphane

Parents have a reputation for urging their children to eat all of the vegetables put on their plate, even the infamously dreaded broccoli, which was publicly decried by George Bush Sr. while he was President of the United States. Recent research into sulforaphane, a cancer-fighting substance found in broccoli and other cruciferous plants, helps reinforce the wisdom of such parental demands.

Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring sulfur-containing isothiocyanate derivative that is hydrolyzed from its precursor when plant tissues are crushed or chewed. Soon after ingestion, the phytochemical begins to act within the body, triggering an immune system response to carcinogens. More specifically, sulforaphane induces a series of proteins known as phase 2 detoxification enzymes to scavenge for carcinogenic substances before they are able to promote cancer. Unlike many vitamins, however, the effects of the indirect oxidant may be experienced by cells throughout the entire body and may persist for several days.

Although sulforaphane has been successfully synthesized in the laboratory, the chiral sulfur compound is still obtained from plant extracts for commercial use. One of the best sources to utilize for such purposes was discovered by a team of researchers associated with The John Hopkins University School of Medicine, who found that broccoli sprouts contain 20 to 50 times the amount of sulforaphane than the mature heads. Laboratory studies have also revealed important information about the phytochemical. For instance, rats that were fed sulforaphane-containing foods and were then exposed to a strong carcinogen developed dramatically smaller and fewer tumors than test subjects that did not ingest the compound before exposure to a cancer-causing agent.


BACK TO THE CHEMICAL CRYSTALS GALLERY

BACK TO THE POLARIZED LIGHT GALLERY

Questions or comments? Send us an email.
© 1998-2013 by Michael W. Davidson and The Florida State University. All Rights Reserved. No images, graphics, scripts, or applets may be reproduced or used in any manner without permission from the copyright holders. Use of this website means you agree to all of the Legal Terms and Conditions set forth by the owners.
This website is maintained by our
Graphics & Web Programming Team
in collaboration with Optical Microscopy at the
National High Magnetic Field Laboratory.
Last modification: Tuesday, Jul 25, 2006 at 10:03 AM
Access Count Since January 23, 2004: 9314
All of the images in this gallery were captured with a QImaging Retiga camera system.
For more information on these cameras, use the button below to access
the QImaging website:
Visit the QImaging website.
For more information on microscope manufacturers,
use the buttons below to navigate to their websites: