Microscopy Primer
Light and Color
Microscope Basics
Special Techniques
Digital Imaging
Confocal Microscopy
Live-Cell Imaging
Photomicrography
Microscopy Museum
Virtual Microscopy
Fluorescence
Web Resources
License Info
Image Use
Custom Photos
Partners
Site Info
Contact Us
Publications
Home

The Galleries:

Photo Gallery
Silicon Zoo
Pharmaceuticals
Chip Shots
Phytochemicals
DNA Gallery
Microscapes
Vitamins
Amino Acids
Birthstones
Religion Collection
Pesticides
BeerShots
Cocktail Collection
Screen Savers
Win Wallpaper
Mac Wallpaper
Movie Gallery

Polarized Light Microscopy Digital Image Gallery

Polybenzimidazole Fiber

Polybenzimidazole (PBI) is a high performance polymer fiber that was discovered in the 1950s and developed by the Celanese Corporation over the next decade. NASA became interested in the unique qualities of the fiber after a fire erupted aboard an Apollo spaceship in 1967, spurring them to combine forces with Celanese in the development of a line of PBI textiles.

View a second image of a Polybenzimidazole Fiber

PBI is manufactured from tetra-aminobiphenyl and diphenyl isophthalate, which undergo a dry spinning process that utilizes dimethyl acetamide as the solvent. The result is a long-chain aromatic polymer featuring recurring imidazole groups. The fibers formed from this polymer exhibit a number of highly desirable characteristics, such as no melting point and inflammability. The stiff fibers also maintain their integrity when exposed to high heat and are mildew, abrasion, and chemical resistant.

PBI fibers first became commercially available in 1983. Since that time the fibers have found wide usage in a number of areas. They are commonly utilized, for instance, in protective apparel, such as firefighter’s coats, rescue gear, space suits, and outer garments for hazardous materials workers. The fibers are also popularly included in industrial gloves and work wear, as well as race car driver uniforms. In molded plastic form, PBI is frequently utilized in brakes, gaskets, fuel cell membranes, and pump packing.


BACK TO THE FIBERS GALLERY

BACK TO THE POLARIZED LIGHT GALLERY

Questions or comments? Send us an email.
© 1998-2013 by Michael W. Davidson and The Florida State University. All Rights Reserved. No images, graphics, scripts, or applets may be reproduced or used in any manner without permission from the copyright holders. Use of this website means you agree to all of the Legal Terms and Conditions set forth by the owners.
This website is maintained by our
Graphics & Web Programming Team
in collaboration with Optical Microscopy at the
National High Magnetic Field Laboratory.
Last modification: Tuesday, Jul 25, 2006 at 10:25 AM
Access Count Since November 20, 2003: 11485
For more information on microscope manufacturers,
use the buttons below to navigate to their websites: