Microscopy Primer
Light and Color
Microscope Basics
Special Techniques
Digital Imaging
Confocal Microscopy
Live-Cell Imaging
Photomicrography
Microscopy Museum
Virtual Microscopy
Fluorescence
Web Resources
License Info
Image Use
Custom Photos
Partners
Site Info
Contact Us
Publications
Home

The Galleries:

Photo Gallery
Silicon Zoo
Pharmaceuticals
Chip Shots
Phytochemicals
DNA Gallery
Microscapes
Vitamins
Amino Acids
Birthstones
Religion Collection
Pesticides
BeerShots
Cocktail Collection
Screen Savers
Win Wallpaper
Mac Wallpaper
Movie Gallery

Polarized Light Microscopy Digital Image Gallery

Peridotite

Peridotite is generally believed to be the most common rock found in the upper mantle of the Earth. The medium- to coarse-grained intrusive igneous material does occur in several different forms and environments, however, including layered complexes, sills, irregular masses, dikes, and volcanic pipes.

View a second image of Peridotite

When weathered, peridotite often exhibits a brownish appearance due to the formation of iron oxides, but the rock is more familiar in its fresh, green form. The typical coloration of peridotite is indicative of its mineralogical content, which is comprised of at least 10 percent of the yellowish-green mineral olivine. Peridotite also usually contains significant amounts of pyroxenes and other iron- and magnesia-rich minerals, but less than 10 percent feldspar. A variety of the rock comprised almost entirely of olivine is known as dunite.

The primary reservoir of all naturally occurring diamonds and chromium ore, peridotite is an economically important resource. The rock, which is also a frequent host of platinum metals and talc deposits, can be found worldwide, but is particularly prevalent in New Zealand and the United States, where notable occurrences exist in New York, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, and the Carolinas. The location that may retain one the most valuable instances of peridotite, however, is the Kimberley district of South Africa. In this area, the peridotite, typically referred to as kimberlite, contains the only diamonds known to occur in the matrix of their original formation.


BACK TO THE ROCKS AND MINERALS GALLERY

BACK TO THE POLARIZED LIGHT GALLERY

Questions or comments? Send us an email.
© 1998-2013 by Michael W. Davidson and The Florida State University. All Rights Reserved. No images, graphics, scripts, or applets may be reproduced or used in any manner without permission from the copyright holders. Use of this website means you agree to all of the Legal Terms and Conditions set forth by the owners.
This website is maintained by our
Graphics & Web Programming Team
in collaboration with Optical Microscopy at the
National High Magnetic Field Laboratory.
Last modification: Tuesday, Jul 25, 2006 at 10:34 AM
Access Count Since November 20, 2003: 9915
All of the images in this gallery were captured with a QImaging Retiga camera system.
For more information on these cameras, use the button below to access
the QImaging website:
Visit the QImaging website.
For more information on microscope manufacturers,
use the buttons below to navigate to their websites: