Microscopy Primer
Light and Color
Microscope Basics
Special Techniques
Digital Imaging
Confocal Microscopy
Live-Cell Imaging
Photomicrography
Microscopy Museum
Virtual Microscopy
Fluorescence
Web Resources
License Info
Image Use
Custom Photos
Partners
Site Info
Contact Us
Publications
Home

The Galleries:

Photo Gallery
Silicon Zoo
Pharmaceuticals
Chip Shots
Phytochemicals
DNA Gallery
Microscapes
Vitamins
Amino Acids
Birthstones
Religion Collection
Pesticides
BeerShots
Cocktail Collection
Screen Savers
Win Wallpaper
Mac Wallpaper
Movie Gallery

Differential Interference Contrast Image Gallery

Taenia Tapeworm

Tapeworms belong to the invertebrate class Cestoda and may vary in length from approximately 0.4 inches to 50 feet. Taenia is a genus of tapeworms that are parasites of mammals.

The lifecycle of tapeworms can be complex and may involve multiple hosts, but their anatomy is simple. Species either consist of a single segment or of a succession of identical segments called proglottids and a definite head, known as a scolex. The scolex lacks a mouth, but features suckers and often hooks which are used to attach to the internal organs of a host. Tapeworms also possess a simple nervous system, though they do not have a digestive tract and must absorb nutrients directly from an external layer of tough cuticle. The creatures are typically hermaphrodites and may produce offspring independently.

Tapeworms are capable of infecting a wide variety of animals, including humans, and may cause medical problems if present in large numbers. Taenia solium, for instance, may infest humans if they eat the undercooked pork of an infected pig, and Taenia saginata may be passed on to those who eat contaminated raw beef. Troublesome tapeworm populations can be eliminated from a host, however, with the aid of certain medications. Such treatments generally focus on debilitating the attachment capabilities of the parasites and then washing them away with water and other bodily fluids.

BACK TO THE DIC IMAGE GALLERY

Questions or comments? Send us an email.
© 1998-2013 by Michael W. Davidson and The Florida State University. All Rights Reserved. No images, graphics, scripts, or applets may be reproduced or used in any manner without permission from the copyright holders. Use of this website means you agree to all of the Legal Terms and Conditions set forth by the owners.
This website is maintained by our
Graphics & Web Programming Team
in collaboration with Optical Microscopy at the
National High Magnetic Field Laboratory.
Last modification: Friday, Aug 01, 2003 at 11:43 AM
Access Count Since April 22, 2003: 20429
For more information on microscope manufacturers,
use the buttons below to navigate to their websites: